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“Cameron is Today’s CEO Whisperer.”
RICH KARKGAARD
Publisher, Forbes Magazine

THE

SECOND IN

COMMAND

“Cameron is Today’s CEO Whisperer.”
RICH KARKGAARD
Publisher, Forbes Magazine

FEATURED IN:

Advanced Praise From

Business Leaders

“The Second in Command is a must-read.”

Verne Harnish

Founder of Entrepreneurs’
Organization (EO)

“If you want to multiply your success and make your vision a reality, I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

Joe Polish

Founder of Genius Network

“I was asked to read an early copy of The Second in Command, and quickly realized... I’ve been NEEDING THIS BOOK!”

Jayson Gaignard

Co-Founder and Head Curator
of MMT

A Letter From Cameron Herold for CEOs
Who Feel “Stuck in the Day-to-Day”
of Building The Business

Discover Exactly How To
Recruit, Hire & Onboard The Right COO

So You Can Finally Bring Your Vision To Life, Grow A Bigger & Stronger Company, and Free Up Your Time

The Second In Command is for CEOs who feel stuck in the day-to-day of building the business. They have no time for strategic thinking. They spend too much energy working on too many areas where they kind of suck, which leaves them feeling drained. They know they need to hire the right second-in-command. For every Visionary looking for an Integrator, this book finally shows you how to find them.

This book will show you the CEO how to find a COO who complements your skillset, the partnership will set your business on fire. You won’t be by yourself anymore.

The bad news is that hiring the right COO isn’t easy. And hiring the wrong COO is worse than useless. It can kill your momentum… or your company.

I’ve written this book to help you avoid mistakes. It will show you how to find the right COO for you and for your business, whatever stage you’re in. It will help you figure out the kind of COO you need, and tell you where to look for them, how to hire them—and how to work with them to bring your vision to life. It will also show you how to build a truly Yin & Yang partnership with them to really give you more free time, and rapidly grow a much bigger and stronger company.

For years I’ve heard visionaries say “I need a Cameron.” My name had become shorthand for someone who can execute a vision and help a CEO grow their company. Keep reading, and you’ll get all my secrets.

Read More

Take a Look Inside
THE SECOND IN COMMAND

Turn page

Introduction

Every CEO has a vision of growing their company or running it better. But for most, the vision is as far as it gets. As the company starts to grow, so do the CEO’s problems. They can’t seem to hire the right people or grow their team. They don’t have time to execute on their growing list of urgent, high-impact projects. They can’t even think of positioning the company to sell.

Many CEOs get stuck in the day-to-day instead of building the overall business. They have no time for strategic thinking. They spend too much energy working on too many areas where they kind of suck, which leaves them feeling drained. And that just makes the problems worse. Other CEOs may be great at the details but would rather have someone else actually dealing with the details on their behalf, so they can focus on more strategic areas, or on areas that energize them.

Most CEOs I’ve met know exactly what I’m talking about.

It’s enough to make even the most visionary CEO feel overwhelmed. The good news is that, though you might feel like you have to do everything yourself, you don’t. You just need to hire the right second-in-command. That’s often a COO, although (as we’ll see) there are a number of titles that all describe a similar role, any of which can achieve the same results. Mostly, though, I’ll use the term COO as a shorthand.

If you can find a COO who complements your skillset, the partnership will set your business on fire. You won’t be by yourself anymore. That alone is a huge change that will give you space to be strategic again. In many ways, you will be one of two in the box on the org chart. And the power of two doesn’t just double your effectiveness. It multiplies it exponentially—and it brings the Vivid Vision that inspires you within reach.

The bad news is that hiring the right COO isn’t easy. And hiring the wrong COO is worse than useless. It can kill your momentum…or your company.

This book will help you avoid mistakes. It will show you how to find the right COO for you and for your business, whatever stage you’re in. It will help you figure out the kind of COO you need, and tell you where to look for them, how to hire them—and how to work with them to bring your vision to life.

I’ve stepped in to help three CEOs realize their visions by growing their companies to over $100 million. The highest-profile occasion was when my best friend Brian hired me to help him grow his small junk-removal company, 1-800-GOT-JUNK?. He believed it could scale rapidly, but he couldn’t do it on his own. With him as CEO and me as COO, we grew the company from $2 million to $106 million in six and a half years.

Brian couldn’t have fulfilled his long-term vision without me—and I couldn’t ever have been an effective COO without him. Brian was the visionary, and I was in the trenches. It was hard as hell, but I was in heaven.

We were yin and yang. And, in many ways, we were even stronger than the EOS Visionary and Integrator that so many talk about. We had a bit of an unfair advantage, as he’d been best man at my wedding three months before I joined him as COO. We also did a lot right, which I’ll uncover throughout this book so you have the same upside.

In 2008, I spoke at a conference run by the founder of the Entrepreneurs Organization, Verne Harnish. As I left the stage, one of Verne’s coaches, Kevin Lawrence, walked up to me and said, “Wow! I thought you were a saying, but you’re a real person!” For two days he’d heard entrepreneurs at the Gazelles (now Scaling Up) conference saying, “I need a Cameron.” He figured it was a business term, like “I need a Flywheel” or “I need a BHAG.”

My name had become shorthand for someone who can execute a vision and help a CEO grow their company. What the entrepreneurs were really saying was that their business was missing a piece; they needed a COO. And many of them likely did—but they didn’t need a Cameron.

For at least 90 percent of the CEOs at the conference, I would have been a terrible COO. I wouldn’t have matched them or their needs. It would have been a disaster. In fact, when I think about all the members of the COO Alliance, an organization I set up and still run to support elite COOs from around world, I likely couldn’t run 95 percent of their companies—and probably only two or three of the hundreds of members we have could have helped build 1-800-GOT-JUNK? like I did with Brian.

Brian and I were two in a box. We fit together perfectly. The CEOs calling out for a “Cameron” at that conference were desperately hoping there was a quick way to achieve something like that for themselves—but that kind of match is rare.

When I meet CEOs with their COOs, you’d be surprised how often I can see right away that they don’t quite fit. And, in other cases, why they fit so perfectly.

Keep reading, and you’ll get all my secrets.

The Chief Operating Officer

A “Cameron” can’t be shorthand for a second-in-command. There’s no one definition of a COO. Ask yourself this: what does a COO do? Or, more specifically: what do you want your COO to do? I’m going to show you exactly how to know what you’re looking for in your COO.

I guarantee that your answer won’t be the same as mine. It won’t be the same as anyone else’s. There are as many ideas about what a COO does or how they do it as there are CEOs. COO is the hardest senior job description to write in any organization. That’s why there are magazines and mastermind groups for CEOs, HR executives, heads of marketing and accounting—but there are none for COOs.

There should be—which is why I’ve created the COO Alliance, which is a network of members from more than seventeen countries where COOs support one another and gain tools and connections to grow themselves and their business.

Just because COO is difficult to define doesn’t mean it can’t be defined. Just because they have hugely varied roles and personalities doesn’t mean COOs don’t have things in common. For one, they all have to work with a CEO. They’re all executing someone else’s vision. And they’re all in high demand in a business environment dominated by founders and entrepreneurs who are often long on vision and short on execution.

I’ve interviewed more than 250 COOs for my Second in Command podcast. From that experience and running the COO Alliance, I’ve learned that although COOs come in all shapes and sizes, they fit into broad types. They have different backgrounds and skill sets, though they lean practical rather than visionary. They fill different roles in a company, though they tend toward execution.

I’ve also been a COO or second-in-command three times. Before I helped build 1-800-GOT-JUNK?, my first second-in-command-type role was with College Pro Painters, the largest residential house painting company on the planet.

I then became second-in-command for the franchising company of Boyd Autobody & Glass in Canada, which later acquired Gerber Auto Collision in the US; combined, they are now a $2 billion company. When I started, we had seven locations; when I left, just as the company was about to go public and begin its acquisitions in the United States, we had about sixty. I was also president of a private currency company, Barter Business Exchange in Vancouver, which was later acquired by UBarter.com, where I became VP of Corporate Development. All that before becoming COO for 1-800-GOT-JUNK?.

So, I know what I’m talking about.

The same COO position in a company can actually have different responsibilities and job descriptions at different times. As we’ll see in the first chapter, a famous study in the Harvard Business Review identified seven broad types of COOs. I think Brian initially hired me as what the study called a mentor.

 

He wanted to grow the business via franchising but didn’t know what he needed to do to achieve that. I did, so I showed him as I was doing it. I later became more like what the study calls “the other half,” meaning a foil who complemented Brian’s style, knowledge base, and way of working. And 1-800-GOT-JUNK? went on to become a Harvard Business School case study.

Later in the book, we’ll see examples of the many different types of COOs and the roles they play, and we’ll discuss how you can tell which is the right type for you—and when you need to hire them and where you need to start looking. I’ll tell you how best to attract the right person and onboard them effectively. And I’ll tell you how to work with them for maximum results in your company, too.

Adapt or Die

The shockwave the COVID-19 pandemic sent through the business world continues to reverberate. Supply chains faltered, and employees quit their jobs in droves in the Great Resignation (aka Great Realignment, Great Reassessment, etc.). That put even more emphasis on particular skills in any business: strategic thinking, removing obstacles, aligning people, and executing with consistency.

Those responsibilities all typically fall within the role of a COO—making a second-in- command more essential than ever for most entrepreneurs.

A good COO, for example, can help you turn the Great Resignation into a positive force. It’s about time employees quit shitty jobs at shitty companies where they have to drive forty minutes each way for the privilege of being treated poorly or working in uninspiring roles. Who wouldn’t decide to have a better life if they had the choice?

Companies need to build better cultures to attract talent; otherwise, they’re dead. The stakes are higher now than they’ve ever been—and a COO is a CEO’s ideal collaborator to get that work done successfully.

There’s an old saying that if the rate of change outside your business is greater than the rate of change inside your business, you’re out of business. In a full-employment market, it’s the same if you’re not building a better company. If you’ve reached the point where you can no longer keep up with the rate of change on your own, the right COO won’t just help you stay in the game.

They’ll help you positively thrive.

Chapter 1

What is a COO?

“Ask questions about everything. If we don’t ask questions, we hold ourselves back, and therefore our companies are held back in an unnecessary way. If we have the curiosity and the humility to ask questions and admit when we don’t know, we’re all so much better off for it.”
—Brittany Walters, COO Alliance member and Director of Operations for Scribe Media

When a CEO decides it’s time to get help in the business, they may well feel overwhelmed and a little desperate. They’re tempted to reach out to the first person who comes along. That’s completely the wrong approach. It’s unlikely to succeed—and it might well make things worse.
A COO could be outward-facing with a focus on marketing or PR and sales. They could be inward-facing and focus on operations, execution, and engineering. They could be IT-centric. There’s only one key requirement, and it’s this:

The COO has to be great at whatever the CEO sucks at. Again, it’s yin and yang.

Chapter 2

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

Chapter 3

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

Chapter 4

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

Get Your Bonuses In Two Easy Steps:
Step 1: Pre-Order On Amazon

Step 2: Copy Your Order #
And Enter It On This Page:

Turn page

Introduction

Every CEO has a vision of growing their company or running it better. But for most, the vision is as far as it gets. As the company starts to grow, so do the CEO’s problems. They can’t seem to hire the right people or grow their team. They don’t have time to execute on their growing list of urgent, high-impact projects. They can’t even think of positioning the company to sell.

Many CEOs get stuck in the day-to-day instead of building the overall business. They have no time for strategic thinking. They spend too much energy working on too many areas where they kind of suck, which leaves them feeling drained. And that just makes the problems worse. Other CEOs may be great at the details but would rather have someone else actually dealing with the details on their behalf, so they can focus on more strategic areas, or on areas that energize them.

Most CEOs I’ve met know exactly what I’m talking about.

It’s enough to make even the most visionary CEO feel overwhelmed. The good news is that, though you might feel like you have to do everything yourself, you don’t. You just need to hire the right second-in-command. That’s often a COO, although (as we’ll see) there are a number of titles that all describe a similar role, any of which can achieve the same results. Mostly, though, I’ll use the term COO as a shorthand.

If you can find a COO who complements your skillset, the partnership will set your business on fire. You won’t be by yourself anymore. That alone is a huge change that will give you space to be strategic again. In many ways, you will be one of two in the box on the org chart. And the power of two doesn’t just double your effectiveness. It multiplies it exponentially—and it brings the Vivid Vision that inspires you within reach.

The bad news is that hiring the right COO isn’t easy. And hiring the wrong COO is worse than useless. It can kill your momentum…or your company.

This book will help you avoid mistakes. It will show you how to find the right COO for you and for your business, whatever stage you’re in. It will help you figure out the kind of COO you need, and tell you where to look for them, how to hire them—and how to work with them to bring your vision to life.

I’ve stepped in to help three CEOs realize their visions by growing their companies to over $100 million. The highest-profile occasion was when my best friend Brian hired me to help him grow his small junk-removal company, 1-800-GOT-JUNK?. He believed it could scale rapidly, but he couldn’t do it on his own. With him as CEO and me as COO, we grew the company from $2 million to $106 million in six and a half years.

Brian couldn’t have fulfilled his long-term vision without me—and I couldn’t ever have been an effective COO without him. Brian was the visionary, and I was in the trenches. It was hard as hell, but I was in heaven.

We were yin and yang. And, in many ways, we were even stronger than the EOS Visionary and Integrator that so many talk about. We had a bit of an unfair advantage, as he’d been best man at my wedding three months before I joined him as COO. We also did a lot right, which I’ll uncover throughout this book so you have the same upside.

In 2008, I spoke at a conference run by the founder of the Entrepreneurs Organization, Verne Harnish. As I left the stage, one of Verne’s coaches, Kevin Lawrence, walked up to me and said, “Wow! I thought you were a saying, but you’re a real person!” For two days he’d heard entrepreneurs at the Gazelles (now Scaling Up) conference saying, “I need a Cameron.” He figured it was a business term, like “I need a Flywheel” or “I need a BHAG.”

My name had become shorthand for someone who can execute a vision and help a CEO grow their company. What the entrepreneurs were really saying was that their business was missing a piece; they needed a COO. And many of them likely did—but they didn’t need a Cameron.

For at least 90 percent of the CEOs at the conference, I would have been a terrible COO. I wouldn’t have matched them or their needs. It would have been a disaster. In fact, when I think about all the members of the COO Alliance, an organization I set up and still run to support elite COOs from around world, I likely couldn’t run 95 percent of their companies—and probably only two or three of the hundreds of members we have could have helped build 1-800-GOT-JUNK? like I did with Brian.

Brian and I were two in a box. We fit together perfectly. The CEOs calling out for a “Cameron” at that conference were desperately hoping there was a quick way to achieve something like that for themselves—but that kind of match is rare.

When I meet CEOs with their COOs, you’d be surprised how often I can see right away that they don’t quite fit. And, in other cases, why they fit so perfectly.

Keep reading, and you’ll get all my secrets.

The Chief Operating Officer

A “Cameron” can’t be shorthand for a second-in-command. There’s no one definition of a COO. Ask yourself this: what does a COO do? Or, more specifically: what do you want your COO to do? I’m going to show you exactly how to know what you’re looking for in your COO.

I guarantee that your answer won’t be the same as mine. It won’t be the same as anyone else’s. There are as many ideas about what a COO does or how they do it as there are CEOs. COO is the hardest senior job description to write in any organization. That’s why there are magazines and mastermind groups for CEOs, HR executives, heads of marketing and accounting—but there are none for COOs.

There should be—which is why I’ve created the COO Alliance, which is a network of members from more than seventeen countries where COOs support one another and gain tools and connections to grow themselves and their business.

Just because COO is difficult to define doesn’t mean it can’t be defined. Just because they have hugely varied roles and personalities doesn’t mean COOs don’t have things in common. For one, they all have to work with a CEO. They’re all executing someone else’s vision. And they’re all in high demand in a business environment dominated by founders and entrepreneurs who are often long on vision and short on execution.

I’ve interviewed more than 250 COOs for my Second in Command podcast. From that experience and running the COO Alliance, I’ve learned that although COOs come in all shapes and sizes, they fit into broad types. They have different backgrounds and skill sets, though they lean practical rather than visionary. They fill different roles in a company, though they tend toward execution.

I’ve also been a COO or second-in-command three times. Before I helped build 1-800-GOT-JUNK?, my first second-in-command-type role was with College Pro Painters, the largest residential house painting company on the planet.

I then became second-in-command for the franchising company of Boyd Autobody & Glass in Canada, which later acquired Gerber Auto Collision in the US; combined, they are now a $2 billion company. When I started, we had seven locations; when I left, just as the company was about to go public and begin its acquisitions in the United States, we had about sixty. I was also president of a private currency company, Barter Business Exchange in Vancouver, which was later acquired by UBarter.com, where I became VP of Corporate Development. All that before becoming COO for 1-800-GOT-JUNK?.

So, I know what I’m talking about.

The same COO position in a company can actually have different responsibilities and job descriptions at different times. As we’ll see in the first chapter, a famous study in the Harvard Business Review identified seven broad types of COOs. I think Brian initially hired me as what the study called a mentor.

 

He wanted to grow the business via franchising but didn’t know what he needed to do to achieve that. I did, so I showed him as I was doing it. I later became more like what the study calls “the other half,” meaning a foil who complemented Brian’s style, knowledge base, and way of working. And 1-800-GOT-JUNK? went on to become a Harvard Business School case study.

Later in the book, we’ll see examples of the many different types of COOs and the roles they play, and we’ll discuss how you can tell which is the right type for you—and when you need to hire them and where you need to start looking. I’ll tell you how best to attract the right person and onboard them effectively. And I’ll tell you how to work with them for maximum results in your company, too.

Adapt or Die

The shockwave the COVID-19 pandemic sent through the business world continues to reverberate. Supply chains faltered, and employees quit their jobs in droves in the Great Resignation (aka Great Realignment, Great Reassessment, etc.). That put even more emphasis on particular skills in any business: strategic thinking, removing obstacles, aligning people, and executing with consistency.

Those responsibilities all typically fall within the role of a COO—making a second-in- command more essential than ever for most entrepreneurs.

A good COO, for example, can help you turn the Great Resignation into a positive force. It’s about time employees quit shitty jobs at shitty companies where they have to drive forty minutes each way for the privilege of being treated poorly or working in uninspiring roles. Who wouldn’t decide to have a better life if they had the choice?

Companies need to build better cultures to attract talent; otherwise, they’re dead. The stakes are higher now than they’ve ever been—and a COO is a CEO’s ideal collaborator to get that work done successfully.

There’s an old saying that if the rate of change outside your business is greater than the rate of change inside your business, you’re out of business. In a full-employment market, it’s the same if you’re not building a better company. If you’ve reached the point where you can no longer keep up with the rate of change on your own, the right COO won’t just help you stay in the game.

They’ll help you positively thrive.

Chapter 1

What is a COO?

“Ask questions about everything. If we don’t ask questions, we hold ourselves back, and therefore our companies are held back in an unnecessary way. If we have the curiosity and the humility to ask questions and admit when we don’t know, we’re all so much better off for it.”
—Brittany Walters, COO Alliance member and Director of Operations for Scribe Media

When a CEO decides it’s time to get help in the business, they may well feel overwhelmed and a little desperate. They’re tempted to reach out to the first person who comes along. That’s completely the wrong approach. It’s unlikely to succeed—and it might well make things worse.
A COO could be outward-facing with a focus on marketing or PR and sales. They could be inward-facing and focus on operations, execution, and engineering. They could be IT-centric. There’s only one key requirement, and it’s this:

The COO has to be great at whatever the CEO sucks at. Again, it’s yin and yang.

Chapter 2

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

Chapter 3

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

Chapter 4

The Seven Types of COOs

Nate Bennett and Stephen A. Miles wrote a great book on COOs—Riding Shotgun—and also a widely read Harvard Business Review article titled “The Second in Command: The Misunderstood Role of the Chief Operating Officer.” They describe the COO’s role as “at once so critical and so situational.” They go on: “While other jobs are primarily defined in relation to the work to be done and the structure of the organization, the COO’s role is defined in relation to the CEO as an individual.”

After interviewing dozens of CEOs and COOs, Bennett and Miles arrived at seven main categories of COO, depending on the role the CEO needs the COO to fill: Executor, Change Agent, Mentor, Other Half, Partner, Heir Apparent, and MVP (of course, a COO can belong to more than one category at the same time, or evolve over time).

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Mastermind, or Event?

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(Value: $747 per seat)

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and Cameron will speak live on Zoom at your event
(Value: $10,000)

Ordering In Bulk For Your Group,
Mastermind, or Event?

Order

50+ Copies

to get two seats in Cameron’s Invest In Your Leaders Course
(Value: $747 per seat)

Order

250+ Copies

and Cameron will speak live on Zoom at your event
(Value: $10,000)

Your “Go-To Guidebook”
When You’re Ready To Scale Up

As founder and CEO, you’re used to making all the decisions, but the business you have isn’t yet the one you envision.

You need a COO—someone who can help build the company you don’t know how to build on your own. The Second in Command is your go-to guidebook when you’re ready to scale up. Cameron Herold details every aspect of the process, from knowing when you need to hire a COO, through identifying and hiring the right candidate, to successfully onboarding and working with them.

The Second in Command reveals the benefits COOs bring to companies and explores the many ways a COO mastermind or COO forum can help grow your COO’s skills. You’ll meet the different types of COOs and understand the role each type plays. Discover how to bring a COO into your company with the least disruption and avoid common problems before they arise. There is no need to go it alone.

Meet The Author Cameron Herold

Known by Many Leaders as
“The Business Growth Guru”

CAMERON HEROLD is “the COO Whisperer.” He is the founder of the COO Alliance and the Second in Command Podcast. By age thirty-five, Cameron had helped build his firsttwo $100 million companies. By forty-two, he had engineered1-800-GOT-JUNK?’s spectacular growth from $2 million to $106 million in revenue in just six years.

An In-demand Speaker, Best-selling Author, Mentor, and Coach. He has shown hundreds of clients globally how to double both their revenue and profit in three years or less. He is the top-rated lecturer at EO/MIT’s Entrepreneurial Masters Program and a powerful speaker at entrepreneur and leadership events online and in-person globally.

After 5 Best-Selling Books...

THE SECOND IN COMMAND

Is Cameron Herold’s Latest Contribution
To Your Business Growth Library

More Advanced Praise From CEOs, Entrepreneurs & Top Executives

“The Second in Command is a must-read.”

Verne Harnish

Founder of Entrepreneurs’
Organization (EO)

“This book is an intense coaching session—in the palm of your hand—that will transform your business if you put the work in to execute on Cameron’s principles.”

Lindsay Smith

CSO of Title Alliance, Ltd.

“Cameron is not only an inspiration, but the best example of what a COO represents. The Second in Command is a critical read for any organization looking to scale to a substantial exit value.”

Rob Follows

CEO, STS Capital Partners

“Cameron brings all of his practice, personality, and prowess to bear in this excellent book. I continue to learn from him, and this is no exception. A must-read!”

Graham Brodock

President of Kris-Tech Wire

“If you need a second command and want to avoid the mistakes most founders make when hiring one, then reading The Second in Command is simply essential.”

Hollis Carter

Co-Founder, The Baby Bathwater Institute

“If you want to multiply your success and make your vision a reality, I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

Joe Polish

Founder of Genius Network

“Pragmatic and with a wealth of experience, Cameron Herold brings actionable and effective wisdom you’d be foolish to ignore. Conversational style—easy to read.”

Jen Leech

Co-Founder, President and COO of TrussWorks, Inc.

“I was asked to read an early copy of The Second in Command, and quickly realized... I’ve been NEEDING THIS BOOK!”

Jayson Gaignard

Co-Founder and Head Curator
of MMT

More Advanced Praise From CEOs, Entrepreneurs & Top Executives

“The Second in Command is a must-read.”

Verne Harnish

Founder of Entrepreneurs’
Organization (EO)

“This book is an intense coaching session—in the palm of your hand—that will transform your business if you put the work in to execute on Cameron’s principles.”

Lindsay Smith

CSO of Title Alliance, Ltd.

“Cameron is not only an inspiration, but the best example of what a COO represents. The Second in Command is a critical read for any organization looking to scale to a substantial exit value.”

Rob Follows

CEO, STS Capital Partners

“Cameron brings all of his practice, personality, and prowess to bear in this excellent book. I continue to learn from him, and this is no exception. A must-read!”

Graham Brodock

President of Kris-Tech Wire

“If you need a second command and want to avoid the mistakes most founders make when hiring one, then reading The Second in Command is simply essential.”

Hollis Carter

Co-Founder, The Baby Bathwater Institute

“If you want to multiply your success and make your vision a reality, I cannot recommend this book highly enough.”

Joe Polish

Founder of Genius Network

“Pragmatic and with a wealth of experience, Cameron Herold brings actionable and effective wisdom you’d be foolish to ignore. Conversational style—easy to read.”

Jen Leech

Co-Founder, President and COO of TrussWorks, Inc.

“I was asked to read an early copy of The Second in Command, and quickly realized... I’ve been NEEDING THIS BOOK!”

Jayson Gaignard

Co-Founder and Head Curator
of MMT

Raving Fans On Social Media

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book-4

Meetings Suck: Turning One Of The Most Loathed Elements Of Business Into One Of The Most Valuable

We all know that meetings suck, right?

You hear it all the time. It’s the one thing that almost everyone in business can agree on.

Except it’s not actually true… 

Meetings don’t suck.

We just suck at running meetings.   

When done right, meetings not only work, they make people and companies better.

In Meetings Suck, world renowned business expert and growth guru Cameron Herold teaches you how to use focused, time effective meetings to help you and your company soar.

This book shows you immediately actionable, step-by-step systems that ensure that you and everyone in your organization improves your meetings, right away.

In the process, you’ll turn meetings that suck into meetings that work. 

In life, we always hear about people who’ve made huge decisions from their gut – without data.Today, I want you to make a decision, not only from your gut, but also from some data.  A decision that is only $12 per employee but will be priceless for your business.

Right now, your gut is telling you something is wrong with your company’s meetings.  You KNOW everyone complains about meetings.

People HATE going to them, they HATE running them, and they really have NO idea which meetings are truly necessary but they hold meetings simply because they think that is what they SHOULD do.

Even some of the smartest CEOs in the world complain about meetings – Elon Musk publicly told employees at Tesla & SpaceX to walk out of meetings if they weren’t being run properly.

I sent Elon a message saying that wasn’t going to fix anything – the key is to fix the root of the problem – NOT continue to ignore why meetings suck.

A Meeting is – Any phone call, video call or occasion where 2 or more people meet to discuss or work-through office topics.

Most employees on average spend 1-2 hours per day in meetings.

And likely, none of those employees – front-line staff or leaders – have had any training on how to attend meetings or participate in them, LET ALONE How to RUN THEM.

Consider this…

If the Average employee spends just 1 Hour per day in meetings – that’s 1/8th of their time.

If the Average employee earns $50,000 per year.

And they’re spending 1/8th of their time in meetings, that means you’re paying $6,250 dollars per year for just ONE employee to attend meetings.

The reality is, employees spend 1/8th of their time – and 1/8th of your company’s payroll – doing something they have literally NO idea how to do.

The Reality is…

95% of employees are booking & leading meetings – and they have NEVER been trained on how to run them.

95% of employees have had NO training on how to show up and participate in the meetings they attend daily.

And 95% of employees and companies have no idea what meetings are even necessary to hold.

Meetings CAN be hugely effective – IF you know how to run them

Meetings don’t SUCK, we just SUCK at running meetings. 

Investing $15 per employee – to help ensure the $50,000 a year you spend on them is an obvious and easy choice.

This could be the most impactful $15 you’ll ever spend and will save the company’s money, time and resources instantly.

Buying a copy of Meetings Suck for 100% of your employees and having them read it this month will have a huge impact on your company’s success.

book-5

Free PR: How To Get Chased By The Press Without Hiring A PR Firm

Public relations has always been an essential part of doing business which is probably why you’re shelling out big money to an outside PR firm. But the truth is that you don’t need them. You already have all the necessary tools in-house to do as good a job as the so-called experts. 

Cameron Herold and Adrian Salamunovic have taught thousands of company execs how to exploit free media coverage and ditch these expensive, often ineffective outsiders. 

Cameron & Adrian have also built in-house PR teams, spent decades learning how to generate Free PR and how to leverage public relations to complement their sales and marketing strategy. 

In Free PR, you’ll learn how the media world operates while you gain invaluable insider knowledge and actionable advice on how to: 

  • Build your own in-house PR team
  • Provide effective interviews
  • Score great media coverage for free with just a few easy steps 

Landing public relations coverage for yourself and your company is a powerful tool to help elevate your personal brand. PR is easier to generate than marketing, PR is easier to leverage than marketing and PR is more cost effective than marketing. In other words, Public Relations is more critical than ever in growing your brand and your business. 

You’ve got more passion, commitment, a larger stake, and a deeper understanding of your business than any outside PR firm could ever have. So stop wasting money and take the reins yourself.  Learn the secrets to landing TONS of Free PR for your company.

What they’re saying:

“I think PR is the core for promoting any business. Public relations acquires customers! That’s what’s cool about this book.”

– Kevin O’Leary,  Shark on ABC’s Shark Tank

“The ultimate guidebook for those looking to get press, grow their brand, and get in front of the masses. Free PR is the roadmap you’ve been looking for.”

– Peter Shankman, Founder, Help a Reporter Out (HARO)

“Adrian and Cameron will show you the secrets of getting massive exposure for your business. This book is packed with actionable insights from two guys that actually know how to to do it.”

– Dan Martell,  Serial Entrepreneur & Investor (Intercom.io, Unbounce)

“I told Cameron to write the book on generating free PR. I’m excited to see that he’s finally sharing his secrets with the world. This is a must read for any entrepreneurial company and marketing team.”

– Verne Harnish, Founder of Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) and author of Scaling Up (Rockefeller Habits 2.0)

book-3-1

Vivid Vision: A Remarkable Tool For Aligning Your Business Around a Shared Vision of the Future

Many corporations have slick, flashy mission statements that ultimately do little to motivate employees and less to impress customers, investors, and partners. 

But there is a way to share your excitement for the future of your company in a clear, compelling, and powerful way and entrepreneur and business growth expert Cameron Herold can show you how. 

Vivid Vision is a revolutionary tool that will help owners, CEOs, and senior managers create inspirational, detailed, and actionable three-year mission statements for their companies. In this easy-to-follow guide, Herold walks organization leaders through the simple steps to creating their own Vivid Vision, from brainstorming to sharing the ideas to using the document to drive progress in the years to come. 

By focusing on mapping out how you see your company looking and feeling in every category of business, without getting bogged down by data and numbers or how it will happen, Vivid Vision creates a holistic road map to success that will get all of your teammates passionate about the big picture. 

Your company is your dream, one that you want to share with your staff, clients, and stakeholders. Vivid Vision is the tool you need to make that dream a reality.

miracle-morning

The Miracle Morning for
Entrepreneurs: Elevate Your SELF to
Elevate Your BUSINESS

READY FOR EXPLOSIVE GROWTH AS AN ENTREPRENEUR AND ACCELERATED SUCCESS IN THE REST OF YOUR LIFE?

A step-by-step guide to enjoying the roller-coaster ride of growth — while getting the most out of life as an entrepreneur. A growth-focused approach: The book is divided into three sections, which cover planning for fast growth, building a company for fast growth, and leading for fast growth. Each topic the author covers — from creating a vision for the company’s future to learning how to generate free PR for a developing company — is squarely focused on the end goal: doubling the size of the entrepreneur’s company in three years or less. A down-to-earth action plan: Herold’s experienced-based advice never gets bogged down in generalities or theory. Instead, he offers a wealth of practical tips, including: How to design meetings for maximum efficiency; How to hire top-quality talent; How to grow in particularly tough markets; How to put together a board of advisors — even for a smaller company; How even the busy entrepreneur can achieve a work/life balance.

READY FOR EXPLOSIVE GROWTH AS AN ENTREPRENEUR AND ACCELERATED SUCCESS IN THE REST OF YOUR LIFE?

Hal Elrod’sThe Miracle Morning has helped redefine the mornings and the lives of millions of readers since 2012. Since then, careers have been launched, goals have been met, and dreams have been realized, all through the power of the Miracle Morning’s six Life S.A.V.E.R.S.

THESE SIX DAILY PRACTICES WILL FUEL YOUR EFFORTS TO CREATE AND SUSTAIN POSITIVE CHANGE IN YOUR LIFE.

Now The Miracle Morning for Entrepreneurs brings you these principles in a whole new light—alongside the Entrepreneurial Elevation Principles and the Entrepreneur’s Elevation Skills. These are essential skills that you need to create a successful business and personal life. Cameron Herold— Bestselling Author and a widely-respected expert on entrepreneurial mindset—brings his wisdom and insight to you using Hal Elrod’s powerful Miracle Morning framework.

DEVELOP A VISION FOR YOUR BUSINESS, AND BECOME THE INFLUENTIAL AND INSPIRING LEADER YOU WERE ALWAYS MEANT TO BE.

The principles and skills you’ll find in this book will help you to channel your passion and achieve balance in a remarkable new way. – Learn why mornings matter more than you think – Learn how to master your own self-leadership and accelerate your personal development – Learn how to manage your energy—physical, mental, and emotional – Learn how to implement Hal Elrod’s invaluable Life S.A.V.E.R.S. in your daily routine – And much more… You’re already an entrepreneur. Now discover how to take your success to the next level by first taking yourself to the next level. The Miracle Morning for Entrepreneurs is your roadmap to masterfully building an empire with a powerful vision, utilizing your areas of personal genius, with the right team at your side.

Start giving your business and your life the very best opportunities for success, right now.

A step-by-step guide to enjoying the roller-coaster ride of growth — while getting the most out of life as an entrepreneur. A growth-focused approach: The book is divided into three sections, which cover planning for fast growth, building a company for fast growth, and leading for fast growth. Each topic the author covers — from creating a vision for the company’s future to learning how to generate free PR for a developing company — is squarely focused on the end goal: doubling the size of the entrepreneur’s company in three years or less. A down-to-earth action plan: Herold’s experienced-based advice never gets bogged down in generalities or theory. Instead, he offers a wealth of practical tips, including: How to design meetings for maximum efficiency; How to hire top-quality talent; How to grow in particularly tough markets; How to put together a board of advisors — even for a smaller company; How even the busy entrepreneur can achieve a work/life balance.